Tuesday, July 28, 2009

Post-TDF Dirt

Pic: Liberation.fr. Contador arrives in Madrid with his GF by his side to the sounds of the Spanish national anthem. The ASO played the Danish national anthem on Sunday instead of the Spanish anthem, which Contador said was "a big mistake."

July 28. 2009--By Jen Benepe
Yesterday the French Liberation newspaper published a story that questioned the legitimacy of Alberto Contador's win at the Tour de France, questioning whether he really was clean of drug use.

Though it focused largely on Contador's stunning physical feats, written by Antoine Vayer (the article reprinted below in French,) also implicated all of the top riders in using a cocktail of drugs that are not regulated but can help boost performance.

Let's not forget how much money is at stake: $2.5 million Euros, or approximately $3.2 million dollars a year is how much Contador will make as winner of this year's big race.

In a press conference after the Tour, Contador said he never liked Lance Armstrong, and even has no respect for him. “My relationship with Lance is zero. He is a great rider and has completed a great race, but it is another thing on a personal level, where I have never had great admiration for him and I never will.”

It's an amazingly brash statement from a man who disrespected Armstrong as the team leader on Verbier, not protecting him on the ascent, but passing him and beating him to the top.

Armstrong who is vacationing in Abacos for a week with his GF and children twittered back, "hey pistolero, there is no "i" in "team". What did i say in March? Lots to learn. Restated."

Armstrong was joined by Axel Merckx (son of the great Eddy Merckx who won the Tour de France five times, won all the classics except Paris-Tours won the Giro d'Italia five times and the Vuelta a España, won the world championship as an amateur and a professional,) who twittered on Armstrong's page, "A champion is also measured on how much he respect his teammates and opponents. You can win a race on your own not a grand tour."

Isn't that what we said when Contador announced that he "didn't need Lance Armstrong," in one of the mountainous stages? And we thought that _perhaps_ the comment was unnecessarily harsh because of a language disambulation.

Um, looks not so.

Now back to the Liberation article that ALL of Paris is talking about. It's title, "The Robots, distanced by the Extraterrestrials," goes on to express with logic and not proof, that Contador accomplished such great speed, and WATTS, that it was impossible for him to do so without being doped.

Vayer compares his performance to other great riders, who even on the flats were unable to achieve the same output. Then he states that there are certain drugs meant to be used for manic depressives, that can calm the nerves, and anti convulsants, hypertension drugs that regulate blood pressure, that (roughly translated) imply with slim proof that there have been blood transfusions to change the blood volumes [of the riders]. The proof is indirect, just as [measuring] WATTS is:
Qui tiennent à l’usage collectif de cocktails à base de neuroleptiques extrêmement puissants utilisés pour les syndromes maniaco-dépressifs. Notons l’usage d’anticonvulsivants, de médicaments hypertenseurs qui «régulent» la pression artérielle, mise à rude épreuve par les transfusions qui changent les volumes sanguins. Les preuves sont indirectes, comme peuvent l’être les watts.
He also goes on to say (loosely translated), "My old colleague, professor of EPS Manolo Saiz, when he left the Tour with the Spanish teams in 1998, said, "One finger was put, one finger in the ass of the Tour." This spiritual leader of Laurent Jalabert and of Contador then thought a good part of cycling so much so that today he is with the "Pro Tour." But before being stupidly stopped by the cops (he uses a phrase for cops that is essentially the 'narcs") in Operation Puerto (a Spanish Police operation against the doping network of Doctor Eufemiano Fuentes, started in May 2006). Me, if I were on Twitter like Lance I would write for example, "Fist fucking for doping agency and police."
Mon ancien collègue prof d’EPS Manolo Saiz, en quittant le Tour avec les équipes espagnoles en 1998, avait dit : «On a mis un doigt, un doigt au cul du Tour.» Ce père spirituel de Laurent Jalabert et de Contador a ensuite pensé une bonne partie du cyclisme tel qu’il est aujourd’hui à travers le «Pro Tour». Avant d’être bêtement arrêté par les stups dans l’opération Puerto. Moi si j’étais sur Twitter comme Lance, j’écrirais par exemple : «Fist-fucking for doping-agency and police»
Vayer also writes in his article that it seems improbable and perhaps impossible that the 26-year-old Contador could achieve such incredible physical feats.

He writes, "After 15 stages, the Big Loop of the summer (literally, but figuratively, "of the holidays,") charges along at the least 40.78 km / hour. There is always in spirit the historic record of the Giro this year, of which the course profile have been full of accidents and difficult like this Tour: the Tour of Italy, 2009 was races at a record speed of 40.14 km/ hour. A French directeur sportif (whose team won) confirms that these speeds [of the Giro] were realized thanks to big winds from the west when the course was following the hands of a clock. Ha ha, the wind came from the east this year, with Serguei Ivanov, his team Katusha and his Russian missiles. The wind that lifts and pushes is that of hormones, of EPO bio-similar and the new products that one calls "neurosensitives." The completely nuts Giro was an omen for the spectacle to come in July, which is no less.
Après 15 étapes, la Grande Boucle estivale fonce à 40,783 kilomètres/heure de moyenne. On a toujours à l’esprit le record historique du Giro cette année, dont le profil était bien plus accidenté et difficile que celui du Tour : le tour d’Italie 2009 a été couru à la vitesse record de 40,14 kilomètres par heure. Un directeur sportif français (dont les coureurs gagnent) affirme que ces vitesses sont réalisées grâce aux vents d’ouest quand le parcours suit les aiguilles d’une montre. Hé-hé, le vent vient de l’est cette année, comme avec Sergueï Ivanov, son équipe Katusha et ses missiles russes. Le vent du levant qui souffle est celui des hormones de croissance, des EPO bio-similaires et des produits nouveaux dits «neurosensibles». Le Giro complètement toqué présageait le spectacle de juillet, qui ne l’est pas moins.
Vayer then goes on to talk about the indirect proof in terms of measured WATTS and output among the key riders, in particular Contador.

Splendid rise. The Tour? A grandiose spectacle, but I maintain it is not about the sport, but about because of the shortened rules by the organized doping. You would say to me, "it's not new!" What it is, it is that the hunt for the doped is weak. Thursday, during the stage of Vittel-Colmar [BBB first appeared in France for this stage which was in the pouring rain], 30 robots since Sonderbach, at the foot of Platzerwasel, had swallowed an infernal speed of 8.6 km with an ascent of at least 7.48 percent grade: 21.46 km/ hour pushing 420 watts, what I would consider proof of collective doping. What's more, these 30 robots were distanced by an extraterrestrial, author of a splendid rise [literally, but figuratively "feat"] : the German Heinrich Haussler, the winner of that day due to a solo breakaway, as good as the one by Tyler Hamilton (suspended for doping) en 2003 in Bayonne or of Michael Rasmussen (excluded from the Tour in 2007 for playing a game of hide and go seek with the anti doping agents) on the Ballon of Alsace in 2005. With all that one could foresee the worst.

Raid splendide. Le Tour ? Un spectacle grandiose, mais je maintiens qu’il ne s’agit pas de sport car les règles sont tronquées par un doping organisé. Vous me direz : c’est pas nouveau ! Ce qui l’est, c’est que la traque aux dopés semble affaiblie. Vendredi, dans l’étape Vittel-Colmar, trente robots depuis Sonderbach, au pied du Platzerwasel, ont avalé à une vitesse infernale les 8,6 kilomètres d’ascension à 7,48 % de pente moyenne : 21,46 kilomètre/heure en poussant 420 watts, ce que je considère comme un dopage collectif avéré. De plus, ces trente robots ont été distancés par un extraterrestre, auteur d’un raid splendide : l’Allemand Heinrich Haussler, vainqueur ce jour-là à l’issu d’une échappée solitaire digne de celui de Tyler Hamilton (suspendu pour dopage) en 2003 à Bayonne ou de Michael Rasmussen (exclu du Tour 2007 pour avoir joué à cache-cache avec l’agence antidopage) sur le Ballon d’Alsace en 2005. Dès lors, on pouvait pressentir le pire.
But, he goes on to write, more specifically about indirect logical proof based on past performances, for the use of substances to boost performance among the robots and extraterrestrials in this Tour:

"But let's talk about Verbier. Alberto Contador was marvelous the day before. He climbed Verbier in 20 minutes 55 seconds at 24.38 km/ hour after Chable [the 10 km point from Martigny, and the beginning of the worst part of the ascent,] on 8.5 km at least of 7.6 percent grade. That is a staggering 490 watts of power... after five hours of riding. The Valaisan climb, relatively short, is worth pondering this exploit. It was Bjarne Riis (today the leader of Saxo Bank of the brothers Schleck) and his climb up Hautacam in 1996 of 480 watts that belongs to the world record of doping. The Riis record is even better than Armstrong's in his time of splendor. And Lance? Just below his best tours. At Verbier, between him and Contador, there are seven other extraterrestrials. Those are the brothers Schleck. Behind them, the usage newly legal of old corticosteroids permitted for the sake of looking good at 425 watts, more than to finish as usual with a wet chest. A national technical director told me it was 20 years since he did that so that the the "heavy" products, in the way of EPO, would not pass [be detected]:
Mais parlons de Verbier. Alberto Contador a été merveilleux avant-hier. Il a escaladé Verbier en 20’55’’, à 24,38 kilomètre/heure de moyenne depuis le Châble sur 8,5 kilomètres à 7,6 % de dénivelé moyen. Soit 490 watts en puissance étalon… après cinq heures de vélo. La montée valaisane, relativement courte, pondère certes l’exploit. C’est à Bjarne Riis (aujourd’hui patron de la Saxo Bank des frères Schleck) et sa montée sur Hautacam en 1996 de 480 watts qu’appartient le record du monde du dopage. Le Riis d’Hautacam, c’est encore mieux qu’Armstrong du temps de sa splendeur. Et Lance ? Juste en dessous de ses meilleurs tours. A Verbier, entre lui et Contador, il y a sept autres extraterrestres. Dont les frères Schleck. Derrière, l’usage nouvellement légalisé des bons vieux corticoïdes permet à des gars de faire bonne figure à 425 watts plutôt que de finir comme à leur habitude dans le ventre mou. Un directeur technique national m’avait glissé il y a vingt ans qu’il fallait cela pour ne pas qu’«ils» passent aux produits «lourds», genre EPO.


Finally he comes to his logic for why Contador is doped:

"On the physio side it's rotten. For Contador with an effort of 20 minutes at 90 percent of VO2 Max, his weight of 62 kilos, his maximum aerobic strength would be 493 watts, which gives a consumption of oxygen of 6.17 liters/ minute: 99.5 ml/minute/ kg! And the foot of the mountain of Verbier was torched after a "warm up" of 200 km at 27 km per hour. The equal reference point of the Englishman Bradley Wiggins, Olympic champion in the pursuit, on a level track and for only 4 kilometers.

Côté physio, on est gâté. Pour Contador : avec un effort de vingt minutes à 90 % de VO2max, son poids de 62 kilos, sa puissance maximale aérobie serait de 493 watts, ce qui donne une consommation d’oxygène de 6,17 litres/minutes : 99,5 ml/min/kg ! Et le pied de la montée de Verbier a été torché après un «échauffement» de 200 kilomètres à 27 km/h. Des «repères» égaux à ceux de l’Anglais Bradley Wiggins, champion olympique de poursuite… sur un anneau plat et pendant quatre kilomètres seulement. Renversant.

Below is the article reprinted in full for those of you who speak French, with a link to it where you can find similar stories.

In effect, no proof, but what rests is the disbelief in the physical feats performed at this year's Tour.

Des robots distancés par des extraterrestres
Par ANTOINE VAYER

Avec Fred Portoleau, nos écrans étaient en mode veille technique cette semaine. Semaine avalée à une allure diesel d’enfer, sûrement pour ménager le vieux lion de 37 ans avec ses sept Tour de France à la ceinture et ses injecteurs un peu bouchés.

Après 15 étapes, la Grande Boucle estivale fonce à 40,783 kilomètres/heure de moyenne. On a toujours à l’esprit le record historique du Giro cette année, dont le profil était bien plus accidenté et difficile que celui du Tour : le tour d’Italie 2009 a été couru à la vitesse record de 40,14 kilomètres par heure. Un directeur sportif français (dont les coureurs gagnent) affirme que ces vitesses sont réalisées grâce aux vents d’ouest quand le parcours suit les aiguilles d’une montre. Hé-hé, le vent vient de l’est cette année, comme avec Sergueï Ivanov, son équipe Katusha et ses missiles russes. Le vent du levant qui souffle est celui des hormones de croissance, des EPO bio-similaires et des produits nouveaux dits «neurosensibles». Le Giro complètement toqué présageait le spectacle de juillet, qui ne l’est pas moins.

Raid splendide. Le Tour ? Un spectacle grandiose, mais je maintiens qu’il ne s’agit pas de sport car les règles sont tronquées par un doping organisé. Vous me direz : c’est pas nouveau ! Ce qui l’est, c’est que la traque aux dopés semble affaiblie. Vendredi, dans l’étape Vittel-Colmar, trente robots depuis Sonderbach, au pied du Platzerwasel, ont avalé à une vitesse infernale les 8,6 kilomètres d’ascension à 7,48 % de pente moyenne : 21,46 kilomètre/heure en poussant 420 watts, ce que je considère comme un dopage collectif avéré. De plus, ces trente robots ont été distancés par un extraterrestre, auteur d’un raid splendide : l’Allemand Heinrich Haussler, vainqueur ce jour-là à l’issu d’une échappée solitaire digne de celui de Tyler Hamilton (suspendu pour dopage) en 2003 à Bayonne ou de Michael Rasmussen (exclu du Tour 2007 pour avoir joué à cache-cache avec l’agence antidopage) sur le Ballon d’Alsace en 2005. Dès lors, on pouvait pressentir le pire.

Mais parlons de Verbier. Alberto Contador a été merveilleux avant-hier. Il a escaladé Verbier en 20’55’’, à 24,38 kilomètre/heure de moyenne depuis le Châble sur 8,5 kilomètres à 7,6 % de dénivelé moyen. Soit 490 watts en puissance étalon… après cinq heures de vélo. La montée valaisane, relativement courte, pondère certes l’exploit. C’est à Bjarne Riis (aujourd’hui patron de la Saxo Bank des frères Schleck) et sa montée sur Hautacam en 1996 de 480 watts qu’appartient le record du monde du dopage. Le Riis d’Hautacam, c’est encore mieux qu’Armstrong du temps de sa splendeur. Et Lance ? Juste en dessous de ses meilleurs tours. A Verbier, entre lui et Contador, il y a sept autres extraterrestres. Dont les frères Schleck. Derrière, l’usage nouvellement légalisé des bons vieux corticoïdes permet à des gars de faire bonne figure à 425 watts plutôt que de finir comme à leur habitude dans le ventre mou. Un directeur technique national m’avait glissé il y a vingt ans qu’il fallait cela pour ne pas qu’«ils» passent aux produits «lourds», genre EPO.

Côté physio, on est gâté. Pour Contador : avec un effort de vingt minutes à 90 % de VO2max, son poids de 62 kilos, sa puissance maximale aérobie serait de 493 watts, ce qui donne une consommation d’oxygène de 6,17 litres/minutes : 99,5 ml/min/kg ! Et le pied de la montée de Verbier a été torché après un «échauffement» de 200 kilomètres à 27 km/h. Des «repères» égaux à ceux de l’Anglais Bradley Wiggins, champion olympique de poursuite… sur un anneau plat et pendant quatre kilomètres seulement. Renversant.

«Un doigt». Et côté stigmates ? Les garçons arrivent sur les podiums frais comme des gardons, avec des petites grimaces pour nous rappeler qu’ils sentent tout de même un peu leurs jambes. On va vous donner quand mêmes quelques débuts d’explications. Qui tiennent à l’usage collectif de cocktails à base de neuroleptiques extrêmement puissants utilisés pour les syndromes maniaco-dépressifs. Notons l’usage d’anticonvulsivants, de médicaments hypertenseurs qui «régulent» la pression artérielle, mise à rude épreuve par les transfusions qui changent les volumes sanguins. Les preuves sont indirectes, comme peuvent l’être les watts. Mon ancien collègue prof d’EPS Manolo Saiz, en quittant le Tour avec les équipes espagnoles en 1998, avait dit : «On a mis un doigt, un doigt au cul du Tour.» Ce père spirituel de Laurent Jalabert et de Contador a ensuite pensé une bonne partie du cyclisme tel qu’il est aujourd’hui à travers le «Pro Tour». Avant d’être bêtement arrêté par les stups dans l’opération Puerto. Moi si j’étais sur Twitter comme Lance, j’écrirais par exemple : «Fist-fucking for doping-agency and police» (1).

(1) Approximativement : «J’encule les agences de lutte contre le dopage et la police.» * Professeur d’EPS et ancien entraîneur de Festina, Antoine Vayer dirige AlternatiV, cellule de recherche sur la performance.

No comments: