Tuesday, November 11, 2008

Cyclist Still in Dire Condition

The cyclist who was struck by a motorist this past Sunday is in a medical coma at the trauma center at the Hackensack University Medical center in New Jersey.

Camille Savoy, 54, was struck from behind by an SUV, and went through the car's windshield. He has a head injury, a broken back, a broken ankle and his lungs are filled with blood, according to the source who spoke on condition that he not be identified for reasons of privacy. Savoy was in a medically induced coma for reasons pertaining to his treatment.

The Bergen County prosecutor's office is still investigating the accident. A spokesperson for the Hackensack medical center said Savoy's condition is still being determined: on Sunday, he was listed in critical condition.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

I’m a frequent rider on 9-W. It is heart wrenching to hear about this accident and I hope for the safe recovery of the cyclist. I have viewed 9-W as a fairly safe place to ride because you would think drivers are “bicyclist aware” because of all the riders. My understanding of many accidents is that they occur when the driver says they didn’t see the cyclist, which should not be the case on 9-W. I passed by this accident on Sunday. It occurred where there was a fairly large shoulder. In order for there to have been a collision, the cyclist had to come off the shoulder or the car had to come on the shoulder. Does anyone have any idea what occurred?

Anonymous said...

Please update us when you get more information on Camille Savoy's condition. There are so many cyclists in New Jersey and New York who would like to get more information on how he is doing and what is being done by the prosecutors office. Thank you for what you have posted so far.

There are a large number of posting to the NY Cycle Club message board concerning this accident and some of the posts are referring people to to Benepe's Bike Blog for more information, so any updated information would be great.

I bicycle on 9w 3 to 4 times per week and I saw the scene of the accident a couple hours after it occurred. It really shook me up.

I was very surprised to see that there was no information in the local papers.

Anonymous said...

Regarding the first comment, "Does anyone have any idea what occurred?", Bob wrote the following on the NYCC message board on Tuesday, November 11:

I just spoke with a Lieutenant at the Alpine Police Station in New Jersey regarding the cause of the accident. Though the investigation is still ongoing (he couldn’t, for example, give me any indication as to whether a charge of driver negligence will be applicable here), he was able to give me the following information: the cyclist was riding on the shoulder, but very close to the automobile lane; the lady driving the vehicle that clipped his back wheel clearly and tragically did not see him, and was driving very close to the shoulder lane. He also mentioned the cyclist had all kinds of room on the shoulder but was not using it, for whatever reason (by choice?, gravel, leaves,..).

So at this point, it appears the police think both parties bear responsibility for the accident. The fact that the lady driver didn’t see a human being on a bicycle on a straight section of road on a clear day for whatever reason is another sobering reminder that those kinds of drivers are out there, and, well, so are we. For me it’s another cautionary tale as to how defensive riders of bicycles and motorcycles (another of my hobbies) have to be.

Anonymous said...

I travel on 9W everyday. There are driver's out there who should not be driving. However, the bicyclist's do not help the situation. FACT - it is NJ State law that ALL bicycles are to ride in a single file. NO ONE FOLLOWS THIS. Yes, everyone needs to share the road, but in my experience, the cyclist's are to blame for most of the accident's on 9W. Now this was a tragic scene and I only wish Mr. Savoy a fast recovery and a heathly life. But, do not be so quick to place blame on the motorist. This was nothing more than a tragic accident. Be safe.

Anonymous said...

Two comments:

"it is NJ State law that ALL bicycles are to ride in a single file."

No, it is NJ State Law that cyclists must travel single file if not doing so would impede overtaking traffic. If there is no overtaking traffic, then cylists can ride double file legally. If there is a wide shoulder or bike lane, then cyclists can ride double file on that as long as it doesn't impede overtaking traffic.

Second, the cyclist in this case was riding alone. So what possible relevance does your comment about the single file law have in this case other than to try to put a little responsibility for the accident on other people?

JT